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the scientists gather can be used to make policy changes to protect and promote our marine sanctuaries off the coast. >> to know it is so love it. and so to love it is to also protect it. [ music ] >> still to come on "second look," this man swims with great white sharks on purpose with no protection except his own wits. we will tell you how he does it and why. >>> and a bit later, how this man survived a shark attack. . >> we're approaching the time of year when great white sharks team in the coast here. when they are here people normally stay out of the water. but there is a marine researcher one man who goes into the water and swim with the sharks without any protection at all. signs editor john fowler first brought us his story back in 2001. >> reporter: the planet's most feared predator has a kinder, gent letter side but just understood says one by olympic gist. and he is about to climb out of his safety cage and bet his life on the good will of great white sharks. >> these animals think. they solve problems. they socialize with one another. they are talking constantly. my job is to k
lives? and how mexico's devastation helps to show us the most dangerous parts of the bay area in an earthquake. all straight ahead on "second look." i'm heather holmes and this is "second look." today marks an anniversary. it was on this day that a magnitude 8.1 quake hit mexico. while it was centered 31 miles off the pacific coast it wreaked horrific damage in mexico city 240 miles from the epicenter. the numbers from the earthquake are staggering. nearly 10,000 dead, 30 thousands injured and more than 100,000 left homeless. the damage was 3-4-billion. people felt the quake as far north as houston in the united states. and as far south as guatemala city. many of those killed or injured were caught in buildings that collapsed. five days after the 1985 quake, ktvu's lloyd lacuesta brought us this report from mexico city. >> reporter: they continue to find bodies and even survivors in the collapsed buildings of mexico city. in the fallen justice department building a rescue worker said they are still hearing the voices of trapped people inside. but time is against them and the r
: uc berkeley civil engineer robert bee used to work for bp on pipeline coercion and showed us what industry experts know too well, how bacteria eat right through pipe. >> this is solid steel. >> reporter: and bacteria get into the pilot when drillers pump seawater into petroleum to maintain pressure turning whoa is called sweet crude into sour crude, significantly increasing problems, like this. indern pipeline inspection robots called pigs, if used, can discover coercion. >> finding it is the name of the game. >> reporter: in san francisco today, federal, state and private oil-spill management teams prepared for a major oil- spill disaster drill. later they week they will simulate a tank explosion and bay clean-up they say hulls also show increased coercion now, but spill responders say tankers are not longer their biggest worry. >> we're getting less and less oil spills caused by tank essential vessels and more and more oil spills by pipelines. >>> this month's explosion and fire in san bruno was reminiscent of another natural gas line explosion in new mexico ten years ago. al
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